Giving Back – and Receiving More

Posted By: Jeanie Hagen-Greene No Comments March 31, 2013

I had such a fantastic experience this month!  I facilitated two sessions for Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) that are occasionally called upon to make presentations.  I developed a workshop, Presenting Like a Pro, and never realized how rewarding it would be.

We had a group of 12 or so SMEs who didn’t want to be professional speakers – but wanted to give better presentations.  So in the first session we talked about:

  • Adult learning principles
  • Developing training objectives
  • Using icebreakers
  • Developing handouts
  • Creating and using PowerPoint
  • Using flip charts
  • Ways to get participants involved 
  • Action planning for participants

The participants left the session and revised their presentations; some had a chance to give it a try. We then met a second time to talk about what happened – what did they try, hits and misses, what did they learn.  This second session was so rewarding to hear how each SME had incorporated some of the points we discussed and how much better they felt their presentations were.  Some of the evaluation comments included:

  • “Great examples of what to do and when.”
  • “I learned ways to engage an audience no matter how long/short the presentation.”
  • “The biggest impact was Jeanie’s input and the input of others in the class helping me work through a scenario of how to improve my interactions/exercises.”
  • “The training was greatly successful!  I liked the second day when we each discussed our experiences with new techniques.”

Discussing what I love to do, giving back to folks eager to improve, and learning from others – does it get any better? 


 

 

 

 


 

No CommentsTags:

Inspired Again!

Posted By: Jeanie Hagen-Greene No Comments January 23, 2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once again I am so inspired by the Humphrey Fellowship Program at UC Davis!  Two weeks ago I facilitated a training session for this group on the Role of the Supervisor.  This is the fourth year I’ve been honored to work with the Fellows.

Here’s a little background…

The program brings accomplished mid-career professionals from designated countries of Africa, Asia, Latin America, the Caribbean, the Middle East, and Eurasia to the United States for one year of non-degree graduate study and related practical professional experience.

The Hubert H. Humphrey Fellowship Program was initiated in 1978 by President Jimmy Carter to honor the late senator and vice president, a long-time advocate of international cooperation and understanding.

Fellowships are granted competitively to professional candidates with a commitment to public service in both the public and private sectors. The UC Davis Humphrey Fellows concentrate on agricultural development, environmental science, law and economics. With the assistance of UC Davis faculty advisors, the Fellows undertake individualized programs of academic and professional development and leadership. The Fellows also travel throughout the U.S. to visit public and private agencies related to their professional fields, attend meetings, and network with colleagues.

By providing these future leaders with a shared experience of U.S. society and culture and of current U.S. approaches to the fields in which they work, the Humphrey Program provides a basis for lasting ties between the citizens of the U.S. and their counterparts in other countries. The Humphrey Program fosters the exchange of knowledge and mutual understanding. The U.S. joins developing countries in a significant partnership through this program.

 

These Fellows travel far from home and family for a year to learn as much as they can from the experience, and then return home to make the world a better place.  I call that inspiring!!

 

No CommentsTags:

Thanksgiving Wishes

Posted By: Jeanie Hagen-Greene No Comments November 20, 2012

My friend, Debby Bedwell, sent me this poem with her Thanksgiving wishes.  I’d like to pass it along to you:

 

Be Thankful 

Be thankful that you don’t have everything you desire. If you did, what would there be to look forward to?

Be thankful when you don’t know something, for it gives you the opportunity to learn. 

Be thankful for the difficult times; during those times you grow. 

Be thankful for your limitations, because they give you opportunities for improvement. 

Be thankful for each new challenge, because it will build your strength and character. 

Be thankful for your mistakes; they teach you valuable lessons. 

Be thankful when you’re tired and weary, because it means you’ve made a difference. 

It’s easy to be thankful for the good things. However, fulfillment also comes to those who are thankful for some of the setbacks in life.

May the good things in life be yours in abundance, not only on Thanksgiving but also throughout the coming year.


 

 

No CommentsTags:

Labor Day Reflections

Posted By: Jeanie Hagen-Greene No Comments August 29, 2012

 

As we head into Labor Day, I’m thinking about our workforce and feeling excited about the upcoming leaders.  

 

I’ve been conducting one-on-one coaching sessions with leads who are becoming supervisors, and supervisors who are great technicians and need a little help with their ‘people skills.’  These young folks (mostly Millennials and Gen Xers) are motivated, the cream of the crop in their organizations, and receptive to learning more about their management roles.

 

The employees report they look forward to these sessions and find them helpful – they certainly make me feel good about playing a part in launching these young professionals in their management careers!


 

No CommentsTags:

Customer Service – At Home!

Posted By: Jeanie Hagen-Greene No Comments June 24, 2012

Wow – talk about superb service!  I was lucky enough this month to experience over-the-top service twice.

In the first instance, our air conditioner was not functioning properly.  I had an appointment set up for the afternoon, and never saw or heard from the company representative.  That night I received an email which started, “Today was all my fault, Jeanie.  The person who normally does all the scheduling had a family emergency when you called…. My apologies and I will be available anytime on Wednesday.  Let me know what works for you, we will confirm it tomorrow and solve your problem.”  You know, ‘stuff happens’ and when folks are up front about it, customers are very forgiving.  Turns out he made a fairly quick repair that is actually saving us a lot on our utility bill!  

In the second case, our garage door opener was dying (what a month!)  The first person to come by made some quick, minor adjustments and suggested we continue on as long as possible with the current, aging opener.  I appreciated his honesty instead of trying to sell me a new one then, so we talked about the cost for a new one when the time came.  Sadly, it was only a few days before we needed them back with a new one – and the installer was top notch in terms of service and efficiency.

So – when you need heating and A/C work:  Call A & P Heating and Cooling, Sacramento, (916) 454-4600, www.aandpheating.com

And for garage door service: Sierra Garage Door, Roseville, (916) 786-3034, www.sierragaragedoor.com

They are the best, and truly understand about customer relations, not just sales!

No CommentsTags:

Interested in Psychological Type?

Posted By: Jeanie Hagen-Greene No Comments April 30, 2012

I belong to the Capital City Chapter—Association for Psychological Type (CCC-APT), which is a Sacramento-area affiliate of the Association for Psychological Type International. The speaker at last Saturday’s meeting was Dr. John Beebe, a Jungian analyst and type innovator.  His topic was The American Political Landscape: Is Our Nation’s Consciousness Developing? Using clips from recent speeches and interviews of the leading presidential candidates, we analyzed together what strategies the candidates are following. Dr. Beebe helped us use our knowledge of psychological type to assess what type preferences are at play. It was a fascinating finale to our current season in Sacramento.

These are the kinds of quality programs the chapter brings to the Sacramento type community.  We share an interest in psychological type, with some interested primarily in research and others in the practical application of type theory in everyday life. Among the topics commonly discussed are the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator® (MBTI®) and David Keirsey’s work on temperament. CCC-APT members come from a variety of backgrounds and professions, with positions in business and industry, organizational development, religion, education, and counseling.

The next program year will begin in September 2012, and we’d love to have you join us!  Visitors are welcome to attend meetings held at the Sutter Galleria in Sacramento. First time visitors pay just $10 to ‘check us out.’ (first time students, just $5).  The regular visitor fee is $35 for a half-day workshop, $45 for a full-day workshop (half price for students with ID regardless of workshop length.)

For more information, please visit:
www.ccc-apt.org

I would be happy to meet you at the door for your first visit!

No CommentsTags:

Inspiring Folks!

Posted By: Jeanie Hagen-Greene No Comments February 27, 2012

Wow – I am so inspired by the Humphrey Fellowship Program participants at UC Davis!  I recently had the opportunity to facilitate a training session for this group on the ‘Role of the Supervisor.’  This is the third year I’ve been honored to work with the Fellows.

Here’s a little background…
The program brings accomplished mid-career professionals from designated countries of Africa, Asia, Latin America, the Caribbean, the Middle East, and Eurasia to the United States for one year of non-degree graduate study and related practical professional experience.

The Hubert H. Humphrey Fellowship Program was initiated in 1978 by President Jimmy Carter to honor the late senator and vice president, a long-time advocate of international cooperation and understanding. Fellowships are granted competitively to professional candidates with a commitment to public service in both the public and private sectors. The UC Davis Humphrey Fellows concentrate on agricultural development, environmental science, law and economics. With the assistance of UC Davis faculty advisors, the Fellows undertake individualized programs of academic and professional development and leadership. The Fellows also travel throughout the U.S. to visit public and private agencies related to their professional fields, attend meetings, and network with colleagues.

By providing these future leaders with a shared experience of U.S. society and culture and of current U.S. approaches to the fields in which they work, the Humphrey Program provides a basis for lasting ties between the citizens of the U.S. and their counterparts in other countries. The Humphrey Program fosters the exchange of knowledge and mutual understanding. The U.S. joins developing countries in a significant partnership through this program.

These Fellows travel far from home and family for a year to learn as much as they can from the experience, and then return home to make the world a better place.  I call that inspiring!!

(About the picture – one of the Fellows brought her infant son to the workshop, and I had such fun rocking him to sleep while Mama got some work done!)

No CommentsTags:

The 2011 State of the Training Industry: Increased Commitment to Workplace Learning

Posted By: Jeanie Hagen-Greene No Comments January 30, 2012

Every year the Association of Training and Development (ASTD) publishes a State of the Industry Report.  The 2011 report released last November shows that organizations are just as committed as ever to learning and development.

ASTD collects data from more than 400 organizations across all major industries.  As reported in Training & Development Magazine (November 2011 issue) by Michael Green and Erin McGill, survey responses show that “overall, organizations continue to be committed to the delivery of knowledge and the development of employees at every level.  As evidence, they’re investing more in learning and development per employee, maintaining the same number of learning hours, and increasing their expenditure on tuition reimbursement.”

The leading content area was management and supervisor training.  Profession – or industry-specific content came in second, and mandatory/compliance took third place in terms of content.

Instructor-led classroom delivery continues to be the most widely used delivery method (about 70% of training), however, technology-based delivery systems and methods will continue to increase in the future of learning.

The good news is organizations continue to believe in employees as their most important asset – and that individuals at all levels need information and skills to deliver top performance.

For more information visit:
http://www.astd.org/TD/Archives/2011/Nov/Free/Nov_11_Feature_State_of_the_Industry.htm

No CommentsTags:

Thanksgiving

Posted By: Jeanie Hagen-Greene No Comments November 28, 2011

We live near a park that is home to a flock of wild turkeys.  As I watched them cross the street in front of my car during the Thanksgiving holiday weekend, I paused to reflect on all the things for which I am thankful.   


Topping the list are family, friends, and good health.  In the professional arena, I’m so fortunate to work with some extraordinary colleagues.  Not only are they brilliant at what they do, I cherish the friendships that have developed over the years.

As we fast forward into the rest of the holiday season, I hope we keep focused on what’s really important, and enjoy celebrating those things.  Happy upcoming December!

No CommentsTags:

Milllennial Insights – As Reported by Millennials

Posted By: Jeanie Hagen-Greene No Comments October 25, 2011

Last week I facilitated two workshops on Four Generations in the Workplace.  You might be interested in Millennial responses to the questions below:

1.  What do you like about your generation?

  • We’re fast, free thinkers, work hard-play hard
  • Efficiency trumps traditions, non-traditional solutions – we’re out-of-the-box thinkers, entrepreneurs
  • Return to some traditional values (neohippies, home cooking vs. fast food, less TV, stay-at-home moms, charity work/volunteer, saving not spending, yoga)
  • Change is good; we are flexible
  • We are not 100% defined by our jobs – jobs are an extension of ourselves, but we’re more than that; we live to work, not work to live
  • Open to diversity/accepting
  • Resourceful and creative
  • Technologically savvy

2.  What do you want others to know about your generation?

  • We don’t feel ‘entitled’ but do want freedom to get things done in the most efficient way
  • Reciprocity of respect: either we both have to earn it or it’s both automatic from day one at work (not – you expect it, but then don’t give in return)
  • No loyalty to company because we can’t depend on pension, only personal savings; we are future freelancers with no benefits, not employees of big organizations
  • Our flexibility doesn’t affect our work ethic
  • Saying ‘You understand us,’ is different than actually understanding us
  • The status quo is not ok

3.  What do you hope to never hear again about your generation?

  • ‘You’re lazy’
  • ‘You’re just spoiled’
  • ‘You need more experience’
  • ‘You have so much to learn’

These comments are a very interesting glimpse inside the heads of a dozen or so Millennials.  Food for thought at work (and home)…

No CommentsTags: